Tivoli Beer

Beers from Tivoli Beer currently at the Mayor:

Brewery Description

Ever been to Germany and enjoyed drinking brewery fresh beer? Chances are you drank Helles style lager, the country’s most prevalent beer. After the long trip over the big pond, German beers never taste the same here. Lucky for you, we have brought Tivoli Helles Lager back from the pages of history. Made with all German ingredients and brewed right here in Denver, Tivoli is a true re-creation of the beer first made over a century ago. Try one and you will understand how beer is supposed to taste.

THE BEGINNING

The story of Tivoli begins with the formation of Denver and the settling of the Colorado Territory in 1858. Gold is discovered and soon the German settlers arrive and start brewing beer. The first two breweries in Colorado were the Rocky Mountain Brewery and Sigi’s Brewery. The Rocky Mountain Brewery established in 1859 eventually becomes the Zang’s Brewery. Sigi’s Brewery established in 1864 evolves into the Tivoli Brewery. In 1900, John Good, the original owner of The Rocky Mountain Brewery, acquires Sigi’s brewery (Now named The Milwaukee Brewery) and renames it Tivoli, after the famous amusement park in Copenhagen. Until Prohibition, Tivoli and Zang’s are the two largest breweries west of the Mississippi. Good keeps Tivoli alive during Prohibition by producing “Dash,” a cereal beer with minimal alcohol content.

THE MIDDLE

Tivoli continues to grow and drinkers continue to love Tivoli beer. After Good dies in 1918 the brewery stays in the hands of Good’s descendants and his long time business partner William Burghardt. By the 1950s, the brewery becomes one of the largest in the county producing up to 150,000 barrels a year, sold everywhere west of the Mississippi. In the early 1960′s Tivoli continues to grow with the Hi-En-Brau brand.

THE END OF AN ERA
When Loraine Good, the final Good descendant, passes away in 1965, Carl and Joseph Occhiatio purchase the Tivoli-Union Brewery from the estate. The brothers immediately face hardship when the Platte River floods in 1965, damaging the brewery. A labor strike in 1966 further sets the business back. In April of 1969, sadly Tivoli beer ends production. At the time the Tivoli brewery closes it is the second oldest continuously operating brewery in the country, only Pennsylvania’s Yuengling brewery is older than Tivoli.

A NEW BEGINNING
In 2012, a group of native Coloradans form the Tivoli Distributing Company and Tivoli Beer is reborn. The first batch, a recreation of the historic recipe, enters the brew kettle on August 1, 2012. Establishments in the Denver area will be selling the beer for the first time in over 43 years.

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